Please choose your territory and language
France, English

team news

BMC Racing Team’s Jackson Stewart and his breakaway companions were off the front for nearly 80 of the 92 miles of Monday’s stage of the Tour of Oman.
BMC Racing Team’s Jackson Stewart and his breakaway companions were off the front for nearly 80 of the 92 miles of Monday’s stage of the Tour of Oman.

Tour of Oman, Stage 2: Stewart Represents in Breakaway

15. February 2010

Samail, Oman

Working hard in Monday’s four-man breakaway left Jackson Stewart of the BMC Racing Team completely spent. But the 79 miles the American spent on the front at the Tour of Oman might just have softened up some of the favorites who will contend Tuesday’s challenging third stage, BMC Racing Team Director Sportif John Lelangue said.

Caught Inside Nine Miles
Stewart said it was his goal to make the break after watching teammates Simon Zahner and Martin Kohler infiltrate a few moves at last week’s Tour of Qatar. The BMC Racing Team rider won the first of two intermediate sprints along the 92-mile (148.5 km) route from Nizwa to Samail.“I got the first sprint to defend (Alessandro) Ballan’s jersey, but toward the end I was fading and cramping,” he said. Stewart’s group, which included Kristof Vandewalle (Topsport Vlaanderen-Mercator Pro Cycling Team), Ben Gastauer (AG2R-La mondiale) and Alex Dowsett (Trek LIVESTRONG U23 Cycling Team presented by RadioShack), gained a lead of 6:35 before the peloton started taking time back. They were caught fewer than nine miles (14 km) from the finish.

Kristoff Finishes 17th
Daniele Bennati (Liquigas-Doimos) won the stage in a bunch sprint ahead of Garmin-Transition’s Tyler Farrar and Edvald Boasson Hagen (Sky Pro Cycling Team) as Alexander Kristoff’s 17th place led the BMC Racing Team. In 16th place overall, Kristoff is one of 98 riders sitting just 10 seconds off the overall lead of Boasson Hagen. Ballan lost his hold on the Most Aggressive Rider jersey by one point to Kristof Vandewalle (Topsport Vlaanderen-Mercator Pro Cycling Team). “It was not a very selective stage on paper, so the only thing we could do was to make it harder to make sure the teams of the leaders were working before the difficult stages,” Lelangue said. “Jackson did a good job. He obliged the team of the leader (Jimmy Casper) to be on the front nearly the entire day.”

Three Categorized Climbs Tuesday
Stage 3 is expected to be one of the more decisive of the six-day race. Spanning 77 miles (124 km) between a pair of coastal cities, Saifat Ash Shiekh and Qurayyat, the race route winds north and includes three categorized climbs – the final coming about 12 miles (20 km) from the finish. Lelangue said combined with a “roller-coaster” section in the opening miles, the stage is tailor-made for teams aiming for the overall classification. “The final climb is where the leaders will want to make a selection to avoid the sprinters, plus any riders who want to get some seconds over a good time trialists,” he said.